fbpx

The art of quilting: Appalachian Artisan Center announces call for artists

Jeremy D. Wells
Carter County Times

 There are few heirloom items more treasured than a good, quality quilt. A good quilt doesn’t just keep you warm in the winter chill – though they do that spectacularly – they can also connect you to deep family roots and provide a sense of belonging and place that is often missing in the modern world. No matter where you go, a quilt can remind you where you’re from, and who you came from. 

Anyone from eastern Kentucky can tell you that a good quilt can be a work of art. But that’s something that the rest of the world has begun to recognize as well over the last several years. An upcoming exhibit by the Appalachian Artisan Center (AAC), in Hindman, Kentucky, seeks to highlight that role of quilt as art. Heirloom: Quilts à La Mode, will be on display at the center beginning February 15, but they are seeking textile artists – and others doing quilt related artwork – to make submissions to the show. The show, open to any artists from or associated with the eastern Kentucky Appalachian region, challenges artists “to use fabric and sewing in the discipline of quilting to make a small work for this group exhibition,” explained center director Yoko Nogami. 

“We are looking for original work, think outside of the usual quilt patterns,” Nogami said. “How can you convey your message using needle and thread?” 

The exhibition will feature “contemporary original designs,” Nogami explained, adding that instead of full sized quilts what the exhibit is looking for are “wall hanging small quilts or free standing 3D sculptural works.” 

The works, she said, can employ various techniques, including appliqué, embroidery, beadwork or other embellishments. Because these quilts are for viewing rather than snuggling up in they may also make use of non-traditional materials such as metal or plastic, but they must be quilted and sewn together. Pieces may be hand or machine sewn, but all designs must be original.

Pieces submitted must also be family friendly and cannot depict extreme violence, profanity, nudity, or objectionable use of religious content, and the AAC reserves the right to reject any work that does not meet these criteria. 

Those interested in submitting work can contact Nogami at yoko.nogami@artisancenter.net for more information. Submitted work must include a title, and include information on the size and materials used. All work also needs to include a ring or loop for hanging. Artists must also submit a brief biography and an artist’s statement on the piece submitted. If the work is available for sale a price must also be included, or the piece may be marked NFS for “not for sale.” Nogami can also provide more information on loan agreements and submittal of a W9 tax document for the sale of any artwork. 

Artists should submit up to three digital images of the piece via email. Images should be titled with a format that includes the artists last name, first name, and the name of the piece separated by an underscore (lastname_firstname_title.jpg). Digital images, artist statements and biographies are due by January 22. Works are due at the gallery by February 1 for exhibition. The exhibition will open February 15 and run through April 9. 

For more information on the exhibit and submissions contact Nogami by email or visit the AAC page at www.artisancenter.net

Contact the writer at editor@cartercountytimes.com

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: