fbpx

What a flag means to me

By: Deanna D. Dunaway
for Carter County Times

When I see the flag, hanging on a staff or blowing in the breeze, it seems like I can hear the many voices that have fought to help preserve our flag and the freedoms it represents. 

Some of those voices are my ancestors and kinfolk. My great-great-great grandfather, Johann Andrus (John Andrew) Zorn, born in Germany 1747, immigrated to America with his parents, 1752. He fought in the Revolutionary War, 8th Pennsylvania Regiment. He received pay in the form of a land grant in East Kentucky, which is now the Lower Grassy area of Carter County. The flag had 13 stars. 

My great-great grandfather was Sherwood Tackett, fought for the North during the Civil War. He was wounded. He and the men serving under him were captured. They eventually escaped and made it back home. The flag had 35 stars. 

An uncle, Randall Jarvis, U.S. Navy, was aboard the U.S.S. Dale the morning of December 7, 1941, at Pearl Harbor. He suffered post-war syndrome as long as he lived. He died in 1992. The flag had 48 stars. 

My brother-in-law, Neyman Darrell Campbell, fought in the Marines and then enlisted in the U.S. Navy, serving in the Korean Conflict. He was captured and beaten, and eventually released. He, too, suffered post-war syndrome. He passed 2017. 

Another uncle, Ray Jarvis, U.S.N., served in WWII. He passed in 1984. 

The red stripes on the flag remind me of the blood that has been shed, by our veterans, to protect our nation from oppressors. 

The stars on our flag tell us and the rest of the world that we are 50 states, strong and united. One nation. Under God. With the hope and belief that we will always be free as long as “Old Glory” waves. God Bless America! 

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: